Archived Messages 2006

January – December 2006

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Date: 04 Jan 2006
Time:  18:20

Comments

now i think i may have found info, help and support I need

got married in AFG

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Date: 04 Jan 2006
Time:  18:41

Comments

Andy just flicked thru bits and the news release on NICE section. I find I am jumpy all the time with noises and fireworks esp. at pm

Chris

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Date: 09 Jan 2006
Time:  14:39

Comments

I think this is an excellent site. Now I know that what I am experiencing is a normal reaction to being exposed to the perils of Afghanistan as a civilian. I have a very long way to go but at least I know my reactions and feeling are normal! Chris

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Date: 26 Jan 2006
Time:  19:54

Comments

Well what can I say, I have been suffering for 10 years with PTSD. I have a stress full job and feel I am almost tipping over the edge most days, I am not mad I know that, I am ill, I except it and do my best to deal with it(9 times out of ten it doesn’t work and I end up being lost alone but at least I try). I have just been in touch with VA and am putting a claim forward. I have felt so weak and useless for many years, this site has helped learn and understand my illness. I am striving for a life with no panic attacks ,flash backs, cold sweats, shaking hands and more, maybe its not possible but if we can all conquer some thing individually then together we can conquer it all.

My best to you all.

chip

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Date: 29 Jan 2006
Time:  13:40

Comments

Just read through the so many heart rendering comments, made by so many brave men and women who have served their country by giving all, receiving nothing but ignorance in return. I am a PTSD sufferer, though thankfully found my own way through the worst of the condition. I started recovery by knowing that I am a spiritual being and that spirit can help us to recognise the pain for what it is. No, I’m not some religious nutcase, far from it! I simply turned within, when nothing outside cared or bothered or knew how to help. Help, I found out, was closer than I thought. It was within me to see the pain, to calm the panic, ease the anxiety and to recognise the stress. It’s simply telling your inner self to STOP IT! Saying, “I don’t this need it anymore”. Turn round to your fears, confront it – face on, and dismiss it from your lives. Yes, easier said than done, I’m sure, but this is what I finally did when I thought I was going mad. Tell it to yourself, tell it to GO!! Each time you do – you will feel stronger and more in control, you won’t feel ‘elated’ or free from PTSD, but you will know you are getting on top of the ‘enemy within’

Give it a go!

John

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Date: 24 Feb 2006
Time:  20:03

Comments

Hi Andy and my fellow PTSD brethren.

As an Army paramedic in the Royal Army Medical Corps for 13 1/2 yrs, I eventually had my demon surface 14yrs after leaving HMF. In Sep 2005 I was diagnosed with the dreaded cross we bear. Like so many I have built up a reinforced wall stopping my wife and kids getting in. Sadly I am pushing them away. At the end of the day as long as I am alive, that’s all I care about as my demon has “Blessed” me with the very strong desire to die every day. BUT, as long as I can fight that and keep living then I will somehow learn to manage the flashbacks, nitemares etc.

Re Combat Stress, EXCELLENT. Just spent my 1st week at Twyrwhitt Hse. Had a very emotional time there but the best thing was meeting fellow ex forces going thro the same things as I am. It was Rosie Gibbons from Combat Stress that referred me to you Andy, so Thank you for this site, it does help even if it only in a small way to start.

My motto, I can’t beat PTSD but I can sure give it a good kick up the arse every now and then.

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Date: 2 Mar 2006
Time:  11:04

Comments

Hello, my name is Scott Fraser, I have served in the Cheshire Regiment, and I served in Northern Ireland, 1st Gulf War and Bosnia. In the 1st Gulf War I was attached to the Staffordshire Regiment, where I was gaining experience as a Platoon Sergeant when Iraq invaded Kuwait. The regiment and I were sent out to the Gulf as part of 7th Armoured Brigade. During the war my unit was attacked by an A10 Warthog in what was called “Friendly Fire”. My unit lost 9 men, as did the Gordon Highlanders who were in line with us. That did not give me problems, but I was very angry about it and I wanted to shoot the A10 Pilot because I lost so many of my “Lads”.

When I went back to my Parent Regiment, The Cheshires, we were posted to Bosnia in 1992 and it was there that I saw attrocities commited by the Croats and the Serbs, and that is what has caused me to suffer PTSD. I am waiting to recieve counselling for this, and I am finally glad to have found this web site.

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Date: 4 Mar 2006
Time:  23:15

Comments

Andy, I too have PTSD, but mine is from Vietnam. I am a war decorated U.S. former soldier. I am now getting my Master’s degree so that I can help veterans from the current U.S. agression in Iraq.

It’s a good web site.

My plan is to eventually work at a Vet Center. Do you have something like them in the U.K.?

Patrick

Hi Patrick, I am sorry and ashamed to say we do not. Many of our veterans are treated very badly by our government, MOD and local health service. We have to rely on charities in the main to support us and provide specialist treatment centres where we can get the support we need. I wish you well in your masters degree and thank you for both your kind comments and for wanting to put something back into helping others who suffer from service induced PTSD and other mental health problems.

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Date: 7 Mar 2006
Time:  21:08

Comments

My name is Steve “TAFFY” Horvath. I left Her Majesty’s Armed Forces in Oct 1991 after completing 13yrs as a military paramedic in the Royal Army Medical Corps.

In Jan 2005 I suddenly became ill. My illness took the form of a sudden onset of major clinical depression, uncontrollable panic attacks, aggressive mood swings, flashbacks and horrific nightmares from my military service. This was all compunded by a sudden onset of a daily desire to take my own life, as this would put a stop to the horrific flashbacks, nightmares etc,.

Between Jan and Oct 2005 I put my family through total hell, not knowing if I was going to be alive from one day to the next. We spent months trying to find out through my GP and psychiatrists what was wrong with me.

My thoughts were that I was simply on “ A downer” and that I had to “Pull my finger out”, get back to work and then things would be OK. Somehow this was not happening and the NHS could not help me as they are not geared up to help service personnel with PTSD.

In Oct 2005 I was finally diagnosed with Severe Chronic PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder). I was told at the time that I had probably been suffering from this for some 23yrs, and that it was directly related to being in the Droppin Well pub in Ballykelly N.I. when some kind git from the I.N.L.A. decided to blast the hell out of the pub and bring the shopping complex above it down on us.

Now that I had a “Label” for what was wrong with me, I could hopefully get some sort of help that would keep me alive and help me come to terms with and somehow manage this illness.

Early on in my illness I came across an organisation called Combat Stress The Ex-Services Mental Welfare Society.

Since 1919 Combat Stress have been the ONLY organisation of it’s kind in the UK with the knowledge and expertise to help people such as myself who suffer with a wide range of mental health issues related to our military careers.

So far I have an excellent Welfare Officer and a good start to my visits to Combat Stress’ treatment centre in Leatherhead. Now that I know what is wrong with me I am hopefully going to be able to manage some of it, and help in someway to bringing further facts, figures, awareness and need for Combat Stress to be funded by Central; Government. In 2005, the government has reviewed and confirmed that the NHS cannot cope with or successfully treat us mental health patients from HM Forces. C/Stress has been recognised as the ONLY organisation with the ability, experience and knowledge to help us UK vets.

Andy, this site is just one of those ways that we sufferers can have a voice and try in some way to get the powers that be to change the system and policies. Maybe then, our future brothers and sisters that will joining this harshfull club for many years to come will get the help they so richly deserve.

I am not some activist of any kind, just some daft old Taffy who served 13 1/2 yrs in the Royal Army Medical Corps who is now being punished for saving so many lives in the Army, plus not cracking at the time of so many losses. I For failing to crack at the horrific injuries and death witnessed, I was able to move on to try and save another injured friend, colleague or even enemy at times.

It is that ability to try and be strong on yr website, that one day someone among us will be able to summon up the emotional strength to be able to shout from the rooftops and bring our fight for obligated help and support, right to the doorstep, faces, minds and purse strings of the politicians that send us to their wars and then abandon us when we need their support both emotionally and financially the most. We have been unsuspecting recruits of the mental health press gangs that attack us every day and night for no logical reason what so ever. We all now have a parasitic leech in our brain that sucks our very personality and who we once were from our unsuspecting souls and bodies, as company for the rest of our lives. For those around us are also now newly appointed victims for many generations to come.

For this reason and even if this one alone, we WILL one day succeed and get the all round support for us and our brothers and sisters that follow us into this life of mental health issues, illnesses and daily battles with life, that we so richly deserve.

We went to our own wars and “Normal” routines in the forces, and even then we were still prepared to give our own lives to save those of others. Having faced death and her sisters of doom, we do not expect to have to see her many years later in a different form.

NOW, is the time for the powers that be should now take notice and act.

Excuse my ramblings but I want to try and keep alive and help others like me through websites such as this one.

Many, many thanks Andy and keep up the good work.

Steve “TAFFY” Horvath Ex – RAMC

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Date: 11 Mar 2006
Time:  18:40

Comments

At last!…Enlightenment. I’ve been seen by therapists, much akin to being in a zoo, talked and talked but no EXPLANATIONS, thanks very much

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Date: 25 Mar 2006
Time:  11:36

Comments

Hi folks, Scott Fraser (Ex Cheshires) here again. Just wanted to say that I am finally getting the help that I need. I am waiting to get admitted to Hollybush House, up here in Scotland.

Thanks to my New Mate, Steve “Taffy” Horvath, who I found through your web site. Hopefully I can slowly start getting some normality (Ha thats a joke), again. I know that I will never be totally cured of PTSD, but at least there are people out there like myself, and I don’t feel so alone now.

Thanks Andy, I’ll keep in touch.

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Date: 16 Apr 2006
Time:  23:04

Comments

It is a normal reaction to an abnormal situation but maybe for squaddies it is an abnormal reaction to a normal situation, I don’t know. Why am I a fruit loop and not others ? Thank god for Combat Stress. I reacted how I had been trained, I walked away the bad guys didn’t..I some civvies make me feel guilty for NOT feeling guilty.

Anyway good site.

mobymonster@hotmail.com

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Date: 27 Apr 2006
Time:  18:56

Comments

I have been living with the effects of PTSD for 18 years, and have only just been diagnosed. this website has been a real eye-opener for me. I cant believe it, I’m not mad! I am just as normal as everyone else. this has been a great tiny step up my mountain, thanks a million,

Tracy.

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Date: 04 May 2006
Time:  15:20

Comments

Hi thanks for having a web sight for ptsd lads and lassies , its only in the last year I have come to understand why my head is fucked up, it has taken me 20 + years to realise, I now have things to do, gifts to give, purposes to accomplish, I require my full strength and courage and peace of mind to do this

Get help asap don’t wait for the men in white coats to arrive

p.s hug your wife and kids

STEVIE-D

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Date: 07 June 2006
Time:  09:52

Comments

I have not served in the forces although I have similar problems from being bullied at school and at home when I was a child. I have found the NHS near useless when it comes to PTSD, I have been referred to a psych who said there was nothing he could do because I am not mentally “ill”. I have no idea why there is such a distinction drawn between mental illness and mental injury, it stops those who really need it from getting help. I have ended up diagnosing myself from information I have found on the internet, of which there is plenty, such as this site. It really helps to put a label on the condition and know that I’m not alone and I’m not going crazy (although it feels like that). I have had some success with counselling, both private and through charitable organisations. I’ve learnt that with counselling it’s important to find a good counsellor that knows about PTSD and is someone you can relate to.

Thanks to the owner of this site and I wish anyone reading this best of luck in recovery.

Rob

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Date: 13 June 2006
Time:  18:25

Comments

Thanks for a great site Andy, I’ve sent you an e-mail. I only came to terms with the fact I have PTSD very recently, like a lot of ex squaddies. I left in ’87 on a medical discharge and now thank God, I have the help and support of Combat Stress, when are the Government going to recognise and support their work? I’m still fighting the Vet Agency for recognition of my problems, as I know a lot of others are too.

Take care, keep up the good work.

Mac

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Date: 19 June 2006
Time:  23:00

Comments

Great site, I have suffered with PTSD since the Falklands War, I am keeping a Blog up until the Falklands 25th anniversary. This is my Blog http://watching-men-burn.blogspot.com/ If you give me your HTML code I will add your link

Mack.

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Date: 20 June 2006
Time:  21:47

Comments

Hi Folks, Scott Fraser here. I’ve just come back from my first week at Hollybush House, and I have enjoyed the peace and quiet, and the group sessions as well, I go back again in November and that will be me attending twice a year until I’m old and grey. When I go back in November where they will get started on me as they say. Thanks to Andy and especially my mate Steve Taffy Horvarth who I found through this web site, if it wasn’t for you guys I think that I would be under a bus by now. Thanks mates.

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Date: 26 June 2006
Time:  15:53

Comments

I suffer PTSD too, combat stress have really helped me out a lot. I am running in a 10km event for combat stress on Sunday 2nd July , anyone wishing to sponsor me can do at following address- www.justgiving.com/Athomas

Thanks keep smiling all!

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Date: 28 June 2006
Time:  00:33

Comments

I love your web site.

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Date: 11 July 2006
Time:  21:41

Comments

Thank-you. I was diagnosed with PTSD following service in Al Amarah last year on Op TELIC. With some assistance on the way I’ve got myself out of where I was and now, looking back, I am amazed to think of where I was. I still have to carry a burden but I’m in a position where I can do this more easily. The advice which has been posted here is very useful and is consistent with professional advice I have been given.

Good luck to all others out there who have been subjected to PTSD, look after the rocks in your life!

Dan

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Date: 08 August 2006
Time:  11:14

Comments

Former KOSB. I had accident at work utter neglect electrocuted various injuries some time later I realised I was not myself and things got worse until I sought help I have ptsd I thought I was going mad reading the info on this site has helped me very much also thanks.

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Date: 10 August 2006
Time:  06:20

Comments

thanku. we need more help like your site to help our loved ones. Tami

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Date: 16 August 2006
Time:  14:04

Comments

Hi to all.

I don’t really know why I feel the need to leave a message, or tell my story (in brief), but I hope it will help someone, somewhere. When I was 15 (I’m now 40) years old my father decapitated himself (suicide), and I found the body. This put me on the streets for a few years, until I eventually managed to secure a place in Her Majesties Armed Forces, which on reflection was probably not my best cause of action.

I won’t bore you with all the gory details, enough to say Northern Ireland , Gulf 1 and 3 tours of the FRY. I left colour service in 98 after 13 years, and left job after job, town after town and woman after woman. In July of 2004 I was involved in a very serious RTA where I was pronounced dead at the scene twice, and DOA at the hospital! Throughout all this I didn’t realize I had a problem of any description, until I was advised to see a ‘shrink’ with regard a claim for the RTA. Once I started to talk to her the flood gates opened, she confirmed I was suffering from what she described as ‘multi event PTSD’ and I completely lost the plot (too many boxes opened at once?).

I attacked my (then) employer with a samurai sword and walked away from my home, my job, my friends my family and my life. I took a massive overdose and was devastated when I woke up 4 days later.

I am now trying to come to terms with the last 25 years of my life, and have reluctantly agreed to seek the support of the local health authorities mental health team.

I don’t blame the services, I don’t blame my father, I blame myself for not seeking medical help sooner.

All I can say to anyone who’s reading this, or looking at this site, is the sooner you get round to seeking help, the sooner your life and those of your loved ones around you will improve. The fact that you’re here, reading this has got to be a start?

To absent friends.

Anon. (I ain’t that brave yet!)

Sometimes just talking and admitting that there is a problem and asking for help are the hardest steps to take. You have managed this and that is something that you need to be proud of. I truly hope that you will be able to regain a quality of life that you deserve after many years of suffering.

Andy

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Date: 17 September 2006
Time:  22:33

Comments

I wish I could persuade my ex husband to access your site. He is armed forces – has been all his life. He has had difficulty in maintaining a relationship with myself & the children for more than a few hours at a time & while there is no alcohol/drug/domestic violence problems – he does self-harm on almost a daily basis.

He is chronically depressed & denies the frequency of his self-harm. When we have sought help from medical centre & families/welfare unit but he has not participated fully & therefore it has all fallen apart.

I have had to divorce a man I still love with all my heart because I cannot bring my children up with PTSD hanging over their heads. Never knowing when the next upset will come & the constant repression of anger & resentment hanging in the atmosphere at home.

I fear he will never find the answers he is looking for because he will never admit there is a problem. What a sad waste of a life.

Just very sad for us all. How do you explain this to children? I hope they will understand, as they grow older.

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Date: 25 September 2006
Time:  17:39

Comments

This is a great web page and it has help me, reading other vets problems. well done guys and thank you all Bob L

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Date: 03 October 2006
Time:  03:55

Comments

I was only in the army for 18 months and was involved in a serious accident while on exercise in the Brecon Beacons,

I was badly affected by the accident and was discharged from the army on snlr, I thought that was a very cruel way to be treated, I most definitely suffer from PTSD and I believe the SNLR made things worse, DAVE

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Date: 05 October 2006
Time:  00:16

Comments

Just listened to a documentary about PTSD on radio1 (Colin Murray) on way home from work, almost had me crying!! I spent 6 years in army, 83-89, half of that in NI, needless to say my head was a shed after, though it took 15 years to get help and medication for the panic attacks, low self esteem and depression. Also had drink and drug probs but calmed down a lot now thanks to medication and focus on where I am and who I am. When you’re in the mob you have to be tough with no signs of weakness, you and your mates really are as one, but carrying the pent up stress of what you see and how you deal with it can become a burden in later life, and I KNOW that most civvies have no concept of what your experiences were like, but please please PLEASE!! Try and talk to someone, it’s better to unburden yourself than let things eat away at your head, you’re not alone!! Best wishes to all!

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Date: 07 October 2006
Time:  02:18

Comments

Why does it take so long to have an appointment for PTSD? Even though I have been seen on previous occasions since 1999 I have been awaiting an appointment now since reapplying for help via my GP in July this year. I had a reply saying they were busy and I would be seen within 12 weeks or so. That last month. Tracked down the sender but still no appointment even though I said I really needed the help now! Not later.

If you are a British War Veteran and have a current War Pension for your PTSD then you can use the Health Service Guideline for War Pensioners to try and force your local Health Authority to get you a faster more appropriate appointment. You can print this off my home page link. If you want me to guide you through this or need to claim for a War Pension and are unsure how too, please email me.

Andy

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Date: 10 October 2006
Time: 23:02

Comments

I am hoping to open ptsd [combat] drop in centre in bordon Hampshire before the year is out. I have just been medically retired from working so I would like to use my free time to help families and service people to identify the symptoms. I myself suffer from chronic ptsd from Falklands and attend combat stress at leatherhead 6 weeks a year

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Date: 10 October 2006
Time: 23:41

Comments

This is very odd for me. It was a strange event for me today. I have PTSD. I was at University (mature student at MMU). I registered my PTSD with the learning support unit before starting the course and got my learning plan etc.

Three weeks into the lectures, another mature student approaches me, after a very boring lecture. We start talking; have a cig etc, I ask him some advice, as he seems to know the score. Before I know it, he is up front with me. A gulf war 1 vet with PTSD.

He picked me out because of the induction day; I was wearing a combat jacket with a proper name tag, correctly installed corporal strips, and ironed.

I had a shock moment for a few minutes but carried on talking to my new friend. I informed him, the jack was given to me by my cousin. Who was also in Desert Storm.

After a while I said to him, so you’re the other one. I had been informed by student learning services there was another mature student on the course with PTSD. I was totally taken aback to be honest. We talked for an hour and a half during a study break. He walked me through this site, gave me advice that the various shrinks I have seen didn’t seem to give.

My PTSD is different from what you guys in the armed forces went through, but all the same. I will look here for support from now on.

Cheers,

Mark

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Date: 11 October 2006
Time: 21:58

Comments

Very Helpful site…

Another organisation that offers care for disabled ex-service persons: www.erskine.org.uk

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Date: 13 October 2006
Time: 11:23

Comments

PTSD and EMDR

Hello,

My name is David and I’ve been wrestling with PTSD for 24 years now. I’d often thought that madness, suicide or a stress-induced early grave were waiting for me, but recently this site was an important link in a chain that led to some very helpful treatment (way too late to save career, house or business unfortunately!) – so a big ‘thank you’ to Andy and all the guest book contributors, and, in the hope that this in turn might help someone else, I thought it might be useful to describe what happened. Like John (guest book post 29.1.06) I had been trying to challenge the flashbacks and other symptoms using ‘STOP IT’ as a kind of intervention, but for me this led to other problems. For example, although some flashbacks did fade, other key ones became even more powerful. Also, it began to feel as if all my memories had become toxic so that unless distracted by obsessive overwork or heavy drinking I could become flooded by a constant flow of apparently random bad thoughts that moved too fast to intercept. Maybe trying to clear our conscious mind might perhaps sometimes be like switching off a PC Monitor – the screen goes blank but all the programmes are still running (?) I absolutely agree with everything that RR said (29.12.05) about the need for a good professional therapist who you can feel comfortable with, and the value of journalling (keeping a reflective diary). For example, journal keeping has been described as “a way of becoming aware of the patterns of our inner life…of beginning to re-create your life…a decision that your life has value and meaning and deserves the effort of recollection and reflection…that what you are living and learning is worth recording”. The problem I found is that thinking and talking about PTSD can be very distressing, and the more you think and talk about it, as in a journal or ‘talking’ therapies, the more painful it can become. What seems to have begun to turn things round for me is a course of E.M.D.R. (Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing). For anyone who hasn’t already checked this out, EMDR is not a ‘talking therapy’ but is thought to work by mimicking the way the brain processes memories during rapid eye movement sleep. Apparently, sometimes traumatic events can cause this natural mechanism to become stuck (like a frozen PC, a log jam or a blocked drain for example), so we constantly relive the experience through vivid dreams or flashbacks. Using controlled rhythmic eye movements, EMDR breaks up this blockage by separating the emotional effects from the actual event (desensitising) then introducing a different and less painful way to feel about what happened so that the memory can be filed like any other (reprocessing). Its nothing to do with hypnotism or ‘brainwashing’ – you still have a memory, just not the overwhelming harmful emotional responses and associated symptoms that go with it. I know all this sounds like hocus pocus, and I was very lucky that in my case it was my ex-employer who referred me for treatment and funded it – my GP was as sceptical as I was initially and I don’t think I would have got a referral from him. However, although not a magic cure, I personally found EMDR to be an amazingly powerful and effective form of treatment that so far has substantially eased my condition and all its symptoms. My therapist (an experienced consulting clinical psychologist) has had success in reducing the impact of symptoms across a wide client base including combat veterans from the Falklands onwards, civilian emergency services, child abuse and rape victims, and traumatic bereavements. There are some useful websites to browse through that are quickly accessed via ‘Google’ and my honest advice is, if you get a chance give this therapy a real good go. The good news is that it is recommended by NICE as a particularly effective treatment for PTSD and is available on the NHS. The bad news is that there may be a long waiting list in some areas (12-16months)(but it could be well worth it), and some GPs may still be reluctant to refer (maybe press them politely but firmly; contact the Patient Advice and Liaison Service [PALS] at your Primary Care NHS Trust; work through SSAFA or Combat Stress; print this and show your GP it etc). All I can say is EMDR certainly helped me, and I hope sharing this might help you too.

Heartfelt best wishes, keep safe and good luck (we’re due some!) David.

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Date: 1 November 2006
Time: 18:15

Comments

Hello all,

Andy was asking for positive stories ,well i was PTSD diagnosed after long service in the prison service. I ended up losing my job, my family so on so forth, anyway after a lot of sleepless nights i have turned my life around and have a new family a new career and can feel lovely feelings for the first time in years and all I know is if i can do it then anyone can . I know it can seem hopeless and black inside but it can change and i am actually finding the experience has a positive side, I can appreciate my life more and its made me a better person more aware, and a better human being to be with.

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Date: 1 November 2006
Time: 20:21

Comments

Yes… I have ptsd. I suffer from it and don’t leave me live in peace. I am sick from it. I am not a veteran but i had a traumatic episode in my childhood. My live is going to a shit. I am in a foreign country. Alone. Always alone. No contact with my family for years, I am working and its all wath is I am doing. No friends. Nothing. Am I going to fight this virus during my whole live?? I am under therapy but I feel no advance. Thank you for your site. It is a pleasure know that I am not alone.

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Date: 7 November 2006
Time: 23:50

Comments

Hi mate, back last year I emailed you when I was really low. one thing led to another and I ended up at Tyrwhitt house for a week, in my opinion and others who know me, I suffer symptoms of PTSD. The staff there didn’t seem to be motivated and after being there 3 days sat in my room , I had to ask what was going on. One member of staff didn’t even know the Army role in N.I . At the end of one week, and being seen once by a therapist and once by the Psychiatrist, I was told I had Mixed affective disorder. My GP laughed at this and I found this very frustrating. I have just been there again and after only two days I quit and went home. I got fed up with being told to go make something in the workshop or paint a picture. I’m gonna go see my gp and see if I can get some form of counselling local to me, I can see what combat stress are trying to do however if they are gonna have 30 or so people in at anyone time , I fail to see how they can give enough time to each individual. The forces really should give counselling at the end of service, I have suffered many years if the symptoms of PTSD and feel that its not been taken serious enough by NHS. This is a good site and it not only brings people to good reference point, but bangs home that there are many sufferers out there and I’m not going mad. Simon 9 ( ex inf )

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Date: 8 November 2006
Time: 14:08

Comments

As one of the lucky few who attend Audley Court, Newport, I just wanted to wish all readers of this website well.

Utrique Paratus.

Nihli Illigitimis Carborundum…

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Date: 8 November 2006
Time: 20:42

Comments

Hi, my partner is suffering from ptsd after the summer 2005 riots in northern Ireland I found your web site very useful because his behaviour is so weird sometimes but when I checked out your site it’s as if you have written it all about him

thanks

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Date: 14 November 2006
Time: 03:03

Comments

I have not been in the military but had a very military like up bringing. I have had multiple bad, abusive, relationships and I feel I can trust no one and especially the husband that I have now. He says that he feels like he is paying for all my past relationships. I know that this man trys hard but his charactor defects, not yet resolved, are tearing me apart. Yes this is debilitating and I have caught him in lies. However big or small the lies are, they leave me in terror and I know that he loves me but I have lost “ME” all together. I was abused by a husband before him who is in prison now for repeatedly beating on me and the last time he got attempted man slaughter. After he was gone I mat a prince charming who constantly cheated on me but I stayed in this for 3 1/2 years. He didn’t hit me but I learned to question everything he did. I moved to Tucson from Texas 2 years ago to end this sickness and I was alone (happy) for 1 year. My current husband and I met in a 12 step program and we both have years sober. We both work our programs to the best of our daily ability and this is good but not enough. He has issues that trigger my PTSD and I just found out abou this PTSD recently. I need help and I can be contacted @:csherribeautiful@cox.net Please can someone ou there tell me what to do with this PTSD because I don’t know where to turn.

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Date: 19 November 2006
Time: 16:25

Comments

Ur! For a long time searched for this information, thanks that at you has found it. Success and prosperity. Greetings from Russia:)

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Date: 22 November 2006
Time: 11:47

Comments

MGBADA JOE,

I LOVE THIS PAGE. KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK.

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Date: 24 November 2006
Time: 01:05

Comments

Andy You are a star

I am an ex Fireman ( Fire and Rescue service from a county in Southern Britain)with 22yrs service, now medically discharged with chronic PTSD from

my time in the job

Andy,You are providing just what those with PTSD desparately need so badly….. hearing from others who show we can survive it. It is such a help

reading the guest book

I have just discovered your site. It is excellent

sid30k@yahoo.co.uk

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Date: 24 November 2006
Time: 01:25

Comments

MASSIVE RESPECT to Jan Beach (expert in treating PTSD) at G Block, RN

Hospital Haslar, Gosport, Hampshire

She saved my life.

Ian

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Date: 26 November 2006
Time: 23:53

Comments

Glad I’ve found this site, I was diagnosed about 5 yrs ago and spent 4mths in Haslar, Pompy. Felt a fraud initially when you listen to other stories but then when listening to others realised we are all ordinary people exposed to something out of the ordinary.

laid dormant for a time, but after SF training and Iraq specialist tour, has all come back, drinking, anger, cruel to loved ones and depressed. Have started seeing shrink who is good, family side will probably need sorting as it will hurt too many, not mad just trying to deal with it.

Can’t find a way to make family understand, not that they should as it’s not a thing I want them learning to live with, their Dad going off on one every 5 minutes.

Will right again soon

ray ’100′

Hi Ray, one way many people have tried to get their family to understand is to get them to look at this website and read through the pages and the guest book entries. This helps them understand ‘a little’ or more important gives them an insight into what you are going through and that has helped many people to accept the ‘New You’ against judging you against ‘Who you were before PTSD and Who you are now’ Give it a go, it may help?

Andy

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Date: 28 November 2006
Time: 11:17

Comments

hi thank god for this site thought I was the only one coping with alien behaviour in a very loving and kind proud man. After 2 years of a complete character change and nasty aggressive and humiliating his family emotional withdrawal and refusing to

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Date: 14 December 2006
Time: 22:14

Comments

I’ve just come back from Basra where I’ve been on detachment. My first 2 tours were quiet, the one I’ve just returned from has messed my head up quite badly. It’s not in the news but Basra gets attacked by rockets and mortars almost daily. Sitting in a tent on your own in the night and the *thump* as a rocket hits nearby is the single most terrifying thing I have experienced. Not knowing when or where and knowing there’s nothing you can do to avoid it if it is coming your way, I can’t describe how bad the uncertainty is that I’m left with. Any time a loud bang sounds nearby I’m right on edge again waiting for the attack alarm to sound.

When I got back all I feel I really needed was someone to talk to who knew me and what made me tick. Unfortunately that person was no longer there for me and after spending 4 days in a house on my own I don’t know anything any more. I hope I can find someone or somewhere to help me get out of this before it takes over completely.

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